A&E / April 28, 2022 The Rap Trap: Degradation vs. Empowerment

By Aiyana Fewell, Courtney Williams, Darreonna Davis, Ianna Fenton, Leelyn Ellis and Rachelle Smith Since its inception in the 1980s, hip-hop music has been under scrutiny by various groups of people for a litany of reasons. Some of these reasons include violence, poor representation of African American people and degradation of Black women. Music is...

News / March 23, 2022 ‘This Is All for Him’: Dom Miguel Stix Is This Family’s Legacy

By Briana Alvarado Born in the Dominican Republic, and spending part of his adolescence and adulthood in New York and Riverside, California, Mario Guzman goes back to his roots with his cigar company “Dom Miguel Stix.” Established in June 2017, Guzman says his father, Miguel Conrado Nolasco, inspires the branding of his business. “This is...

Fact-Checks / March 23, 2022 Wordle Has Not Become More Difficult After Being Bought by The New York Times

By Leelyn Ellis On Monday, Jan. 31, The New York Times announced that they had bought the popular online game Wordle from its creator, Josh Wardle. Along with the announcement has come some hesitancy about the future of the game, including its difficulty and access. Users familiar with other games by The New York Times...

Raised Tuition for Howard University Students
Education

Raised Tuition for Howard University Students

By Gregory Smith Howard University students arrived back on campus on August 23, 2021 to complete the 2021-2022 academic school year in person.  Upon arrival students were shocked to learn of tuition increases during an ongoing pandemic. Along with the tuition increase, some students didn’t receive housing assignments until the first week of school. Students…

The Art of the Pivot
A&E

The Art of the Pivot

By: Hadiya Presswood Sesh, a student-organized collective dedicated to artistic exploration and creative expression, is revamping despite challenges as campus life moves into a hybrid model. The organization, while not formally recognized by Howard University, is popular amongst the student body. At its onset, Sesh was hosted in the apartment of its founder, filmmaker and…

When Reparations Begin at Home
Politics and Government

When Reparations Begin at Home

By Jade Boone Evanston Alderman Ciceley Fleming, a sixth-generation Black resident of the Illinois city and a strong advocate for defunding the local police department, was a dissenting voice and the only vote against what many hailed as a landmark local reparations bill. The legislation, which would provide grants of up to $25,000 to assist…

Racist, or Not? It’s in the Eyes of the Beholders
Sports

Racist, or Not? It’s in the Eyes of the Beholders

By Gregory Smith Jr. First came the injury. For the third year in a row, arch rival Oklahoma whipped Texas in the Red River Showdown, a football classic. In Dallas, no less. In Cotton Bowl Stadium. (Seating capacity: 92,000.) In quadruple overtime. 53-45. It was a close contest with, unfortunately for some, a predictable outcome….

When Being First Matters, But Only So Much
Sports

When Being First Matters, But Only So Much

By Monét Bowen The Washington Football team ended its season boasting about its victories in matters of top-tier diversity, ways that it had jumped ahead of other teams in the NFL, where 70 percent of the players are Black, but a vast majority of the head coaches and front-office executives are not. The team announced…

Discovered: Black Gold in the NFL
Sports

Discovered: Black Gold in the NFL

By Gregory Smith, Jr. It was 33 years ago when Doug Williams became the first Black quarterback to be a starter and Most Valuable Player in a Super Bowl. Williams led the Washington Redskins to victory over John Elway and the Denver Broncos, 42-10. So much for those who had argued that Black athletes could…

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